Tag Archives: best friend forever

More Than Words…

19 Mar

Ernie is speaking “word salad” these days.  There is no logic to his words yet he often speaks with energy and expressive body language.  He seems to know exactly what he is saying and I pretend to follow.  I have learned to laugh at his stories and agree with his muddled statements as he points to something I don’t see or recognize.  His verbal attempts give me mixed emotions:  Joy from his fervor and desire to talk; and sadness over the devastating loss of his well-educated Cambridge vocabulary.

My husband is losing ground and I see his disease taking hold of his ability to connect more and more.  Each week, I see him going downhill and I am frightened.  Last weekend, I decided that I wanted to try to bring him home for dinner — perhaps for his last visit.  I am so glad I did.  Although he showed little recognition of home, he recognized Missy, our cat, and sat down on the bed to pet and “converse” with her as he used to do.

Ernie seemed relaxed as we had dinner at our normal places at the table and silently enjoyed being together.  After dinner, we joined Missy on our bed — where Ernie seemed most comfortable.   I yearned to hold him and tell him how much I loved him and did just that.   Ernie responded as if he understood every word and held me tightly.  Our eyes met and I cried and thanked him for being the wonderful husband he had been to me.  He answered with a tear in his eye in a sentence that made no sense but was loaded with love and affection.  He understood.  We deeply connected without the need for words at that moment and seconds passed in silence. Then, surprisingly,  Ernie turned to me and stated in perfect English, “We love each other in a very nice way.”

I am not sure Ernie will remember last night but the connection we shared and his well-spoken, heart-felt words that found their way to me at that moment  will remain in my memory for the rest of my life.  I don’t understand what exactly happens to the brain with Alzheimer’s but I do know that love still remains in tact no matter how much of the cognitive piece is gone.   Love is energy and feeling and means so much more than words.

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Stand By Me

1 Apr

I know that most of my friends have tried to stand by me through the challenging experience with my husband’s Alzheimer’s and I appreciate it.  However, no friend can really understand unless he/she walks the same path.  The greatest gift of friendship for me, at a time I really needed it, came from my attending an A.D. support group in 2010…

My life was off-balance as I felt so alone in my relationship with Ernie and his Alzheimer’s.  Reluctantly, I signed us up for a support group that included both the care giver and the family member with A.D.  It was there that I met Linda.  Although we had different backgrounds, we were both the same age, shared similar careers, and found ourselves at the same stages of acceptance of our husbands’ Alzheimer’s disease.  Little did I know that she would become one of my very closest of friends and confidants!

Her husband, although younger than mine, had been successful and extremely respected in his career, as was Ernie.  Both of the men were at similar stages of the disease and became buddies from the start.  Linda and I arranged the first social get together, as a foursome, for dinner.   Through the next year, we planned meals, movies, concerts, local theatre and events, and weekend trips and vacations together — all four of us.   Ernie and Alan had their relationship, while Linda and I had our friendship with full understanding of each others’  challenges.  We talked daily by phone, supporting each other through all the ups and downs of our lives.  Together, we made it our goal to learn more about Alzheimer’s. We researched, attended programs, visited senior  and assisted living centers, and looked for the best care solutions for our husbands and ourselves going forward. We wanted to give Ernie and Alan the most happiness we could and, at the same time, make life more bearable for ourselves.

Through Linda’s friendship, I have found myself feeling more balanced in my stance —  I don’t know what I would have done without her.

My advice to other care partners:  Attend support groups.  Find support from someone who walks the same path.    Having a friendship through true understanding, will allow each of you to stand together and feel more grounded.